5 Beautiful British Coastal Towns

Stretches of coastline, collections of cliffs and well preserved historic buildings, are all characteristics that make our coastal towns unique. There is something very special about our seaside destinations, that simply cannot be replicated anywhere else in the world. Our constant complaints about the weather is one of our inside jokes, but our love for folding up our trousers and strolling along the beach in the summer, has kept us patriotic. What better way to spend the summer than to yacht from coastal town to town, taking in the majestic British countryside. Here, we admire five of our towns that were built on the sea.

1. Whitby

Whitby is a quaint seaside town in north Yorkshire. It’s a popular tourist haunt because it’s historical, picturesque and boasts some of the best coastline in Britain. Tourism began as early as the Georgian era and you cannot escape the iconic view of Whitby Abbey, that dominates this town. Built in AD 657 by the Saxons, the ruins sit high above the town awaiting its many visitors. Bram Stoker was enamoured with it’s Gothic glory, subsequently writing the famous classic, Dracula. Whitby consists of beautiful old houses, cobbled streets and sandy beaches. This town built on the sea, is an English classic.

Whitby harbour
Whitby Harbour – flickr photo by steve p2008

2. Cromer

This Norfolk coastal wonder, sits high above the vast shorelines. Cromer was given its name in 1297. It became a visitors delight in the early 19th Century. Wealthy families from nearby Norwich, would relocate here for the summer and enjoy traditional Cromer crab. Its popularity still exists today. Cromer and the surrounding areas, have been affectionately named poppyland, due to the expanse of poppies that adorn this region. Its traditional Victorian pier remains intact, as do its narrow streets and alleyways.

3. Walton-on-the-Naze

Walton-on-the-Naze in Essex, is original and authentic. It’s a small town with surrounding cliffs and a cute sandy beach. It still houses its original pier, which is the second longest in Britain. The Naze is a fifty acre headland, with heath and woodland. Pop into Naze tower, which was built in 1721. It’s this area that’s particularity rich in history, with evidence of New Stone Age settlements. It became a Victorian seaside resort in the 19th century and was popular for day outings. In the mid 1800’s a newly built railway and pier, made it an even more attractive destination.

Harbour
Harbour – flickr photo by myeralan

4. Littlehampton

Littlehampton is a charming West Sussex town, that was built on the sea dating back to 1086. It has a wonderful harbour at the opening of the river Arun. Littlehampton was inhabited by the Romans and was recorded in the Domesday book. Primarily a fishing town, this area now has a busy marina. There are great all year weather conditions for watersports, including, sailing, surfing, scuba diving and fishing.

5. Llandudno

Llandudno is one of the largest resorts in Wales. Situated in Conwy County Borough, this seaside beauty spot was developed in the stone age. An Edwardian cable tramway was built in 1902 and is still working. It will transport you to the Great Orme Country park, or the more adventurous can walk. Llandudno has a wooden built pier, that was finished in 1878. Walking the length of this pier will probably take a while, it’s the longest in Wales.

Fancy yachting around from coastal port to coastal port? Mustang Sailing in Sussex provide a solid grounding in popular RYA day skipper sailing courses that will keep you confident and assured as you skipper from town to town.